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Brown trout are like panthers - they move in a considered and stealthy way until the prey is within striking distance. In a flash they pounce and their prey is now a meal.

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Fish held in a person's hand Brown trout

Tasmania's Brown Trout

Brown trout are like panthers - they move in a considered and stealthy way until the prey is within striking distance. In a flash they pounce and their prey is now a meal.

Tasmania's brown trout are like that and in the crystal clear water you can see it all happen as they chase mayflies, caddis, damsels and dragonflies.

Tasmanian fly fishers are arguably the best 'polaroiders' in the world and rate it as the highest art - seeing the prey before they see you.

This is when they turn the tables on the trout and it is not the mayfly that is the prey it is the trout, and you, the angler, are the hunter. 

For fly fishers it is about presentation and speed as well. It comes down to delivery of the fly in a fast and accurate manner. Being a great caster, and that can mean a number of things, can give an incredibly advantage and will increase the success rate tenfold.

Sight fishing to large brown trout is not just exciting it is often the most successful method. Tasmania has what is regarded by many as the purest strain of brown trout in the world. They were not always there though. In 1864 after many unsuccessful attempts trout were acclimatised from the northern hemisphere to the southern.

Tasmanians developed the technology (if you could call it that back in the mid 19th century) that enabled trout and salmon eggs to be delivered over a journey of many months, through the equator and into a different hemisphere. 

This of course led the way for rainbow trout to be relocated from California to New Zealand, then to Australia. Both countries have some of the best fly fishing for wild trout populations on the planet thanks to those early Tasmanian pioneers.

The first brown trout was born in Tasmanian waters on the 4th of May, 1864. Tasmanian fly fishers have always celebrated this date with a birthday party but this 2014 will be different. This will be the 150th year of trout in Tasmania and great events are planned around the state.

Come and visit us. Catch some wild brown trout in a sight fishing environment with a dry fly. Then help us celebrate and drink a toast to one of the purest strains of wild brown trout on the planet.