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There’s an entire subterranean world that exists beneath your feet in Tasmania.

It’s the site of spectacular cave networks that include rivers, reflection pools and caverns full of glow-worms.

At 395m below the surface, Niggly Cave in south-west Tasmania is Australia’s deepest cave; it’s part of the Junee Florentine system, which spans more than 600 caves and 50km of explored passages.

This mysterious world contains archaeological sites of extinct megafauna, ancient sediments from the glacial periods and unique cave-adapted fauna species.

 

Best caves

Hastings Caves and Thermal Springs

Beneath dense forest and fern-filled glades in southern Tasmania lies the expansive dolomite cave system of Hastings Caves. It began to form more than 40 million years ago. Take a guided tour of Newdegate Cave and then enjoy a dip in the natural thermal springs on site.

Gunns Plains

Discovered in 1906 by a hunter whose dogs fell down a hole, the cave system of Gunns Plains in the state’s north-west was formed by an underground river that’s still inhabited by freshwater crayfish, eels and fish. The show caves include calcite shawls, flowstones and a glittering glow-worm display. 

 

A charming wooden boardwalk is surrounded by lush, dense, green ferns on either side on the walk to Hastings Caves and Thermal Springs.
Hastings Caves and Thermal Springs
Jess Bonde
Mole Creek

In the state’s north west, Mole Creek Karst National Park  contains more than 300 known caves in a hidden world of astonishing limestone formations. Marakoopa and King Solomons caves are the two most accessible, with tours offering stunning displays and a unique view of this underground world.

Go wild

Or stay mild in the Mole Creek area with a private caving tour that can be family friendly or focused on photography.

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