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Time-travel in the geographic and historical heart of the island.

A road trip through the Heartlands is a step back through the decades and centuries.

 

Explore gorgeous heritage towns

Strolling through the Heartlands' colonial towns is like stepping onto the set of a period drama, though here the history is living and the communities are thriving. Colonial-era gems include Ross, one of Australia’s finest 19th century villages, and Oatlands, which has the nation’s largest collection of sandstone Georgian buildings - 87 alone in the long main street. The entire town of Evandale is National Trust-classified, with plenty to discover behind its handsome facades. 

 

Go fishing

The Heartlands is one of the world's great trout fisheries, with arguably the purest strain of wild brown trout on Earth thriving in its rivers and scores of lakes in the Central Highlands. These trout are wild and wily, so seek out a fishing guide with experienced outfits.

A woman is stood waist deep in the water fly fishing on Penstock Lagoon.
Fly fishing on Penstock Lagoon
Adam Gibson

Hear convict echoes

The colonial architecture of the Heartlands was built the hard way, by hand, using convict labour. The neighbouring estates of Woolmers and Brickendon are showpiece examples of pioneer farming, both of them UNESCO World Heritage-listed convict sites. Reminders of convict effort are seen in scores of private and public buildings across the region, and in working features such as the intricately carved Ross Bridge. And the stories are legion in sites such as the Ross Female Factory, a probation station for female convicts and their babies.

 

Trace history

This region is the true historical heart of Tasmanian agriculture. The Tasmanian Wool Centre in Ross traces the history of the wool industry across the Midlands, and this heritage comes alive during a stay at the 200-year-old Clayfield Homestead, on a working farm at Bishopsbourne. The Highlands Power Trail traces the history of Tasmania's hydroelectric scheme, including the state's original hydro power station at Waddamana.

 

Marvel at natural wonders

Hundreds of lakes sprinkle the Central Highlands, waterfalls pour magnificently over the edge of the Great Western Tiers, and elaborate limestone caves puncture the earth around Mole Creek. Park rangers conduct tours through Marakoopa Cave at Mole Creek, or brace yourself for a spelunking trip with Wild Cave Tours. Above ground, head for the heights of Quamby Bluff for vast views across northern Tasmania. The return walk to the summit takes about 5hr. Or set aside a day for the 10km return walk into Meander Falls, which often freeze in winter.

Exterior front on shot of Brickendon Estate, one of Tasmania's oldest farming properties.
Brickendon
Alastair Bett
Clay-like shards hanging from the roof of the caves in Mole Creek Caves.
Marakoopa Cave
Tourism Australia & Graham Freeman

Taste whisky

Where coaching inns were once the watering holes of choice through the Heartlands, whisky distilleries are today just as prevalent. Visit a working whisky village in a restored historical estate at Lark Distillerty at Pontville. Or step into the grandeur of a transformed coaching inn at Old Kempton Distillery. Other malt marvels can be found at Adams Distillery in Perth, Launceston Distillery near Evandale and Belgrove Distillery in Kempton.

 

Hunt for treasures

Befitting its storied past, the Heartlands is a treasure trove for antique lovers and keen shoppers. Antique stores dot the heritage streetscapes of towns including Oatlands (don't miss the Jardin Room), Campbell Town and Evandale. Book lovers, meanwhile, are drawn to Campbell Town’s secondhand bookshops, among them the Book Cellar, located beneath a former coaching inn. The cellar was once used as the cells for convicts who built the town's Red Bridge. Find more about antique shopping here.

 

Interior of lots of old and new books at The Book Cellar.
The Book Cellar
Chris Crerar
Old Kempton Distillery
Old Kempton Distillery
Lusy Productions

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